SoftICE presents educational research at CSEDU 2017

SoftICE members Ottar L. Osen and Robin T. Bye and will be presenting two educational research papers at the 9th International Conference on Computer Supported Education (CSEDU 2017) in Porto, Portugal on 21–23 April:

  • Ottar L. Osen and Robin T. Bye. Reflections on teaching electrical and computer engineering courses at the bachelor level. In Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Supported Education — Volume 2: CSEDU (CSEDU ’17), pages 57–68. INSTICC, SCITEPRESS, April 2017. Download pdf.
  • Robin T. Bye. The teacher as a facilitator for learning: Flipped classroom in a master’s course on artificial intelligence. In Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Supported Education — Volume 1: CSEDU (CSEDU ’17), pages 184–195. INSTICC, SCITEPRESS, April 2017. Download pdf.

The full papers and other work is available for download here: http://www.robinbye.com | Publications

The paper abstracts are provided below.

Reflections on teaching electrical and computer engineering courses at the bachelor level

This paper reflects on a number of observations the authors have made over many years of teaching courses in electrical and computer engineering bachelor programmes.
We suggest various methods and tips for improving lectures, attendance, group work, and compulsory coursework, and discuss aspects of facilitating active learning, focussing on simple in-classroom activities and larger problem-based activities such as assignments, projects, and laboratory work. Moreover, we identify solving real-world problems by means of practical application of relevant theory as key to achieving intended learning outcomes. Our observations and reflections are then put into a theoretical context, including students’ approaches of learning, constructive alignment, active learning, and problem-based versus problem-solving learning. Finally, we present and discuss some recent results from a student evaluation survey and draw some conclusions.

The teacher as a facilitator for learning: Flipped classroom in a master’s course on artificial intelligence

In this paper, I present a flipped classroom approach for teaching a master’s course on artificial intelligence. Traditional lectures in the classroom are outsourced to an open online course to free up valuable time for active, in-class learning activities. In addition, students design and implement intelligent algorithms for solving a variety of relevant problems cherrypicked from online game-like code development platforms. Learning activities are carefully chosen to align with intended learning outcomes, course curriculum, and assessment to allow for learning to be constructed by the students themselves under guidance by the teacher, much in accord with the theory of constructive alignment. Thus, the teacher acts as a facilitator for learning, much similar to that of a personal trainer or a coach. I present an overview of relevant literature, the course content and teaching methods, and a recent course evaluation, before I discuss some limiting frame factors and challenges with the approach and point to future work.

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    About Robin T. Bye

    My name is Robin T. Bye and I am an associate professor in automation engineering and member of the Software and Intelligent Control Engineering Laboratory (SoftICE Lab) at NTNU in Ålesund (formerly Aalesund University College), the Ålesund Campus of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. Apart from teaching automation and computer engineering classes the bachelor and master level on topics such as artificial intelligence, cybernetics, microcontrollers, and intelligent systems, I also supervise PhD, master, and bachelor students on their thesis topics. My main research interests belong to the broad areas of artificial intelligence (AI) and cybernetics, specifically topics such as intelligent control engineering, virtual prototyping, neuroengineering and brain control, as well as dynamic resource allocation and operations research, and also research in teaching and education.

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